Marc Bodie

Marc Bodie's reinforced concrete Pariah Heads are engaged in a physical and emotional tussle of creation and corrosion, the resilient industrial material playing host to expressions of human distress and fragility. Bodie’s medium choice conjures an awareness of his urban surroundings yet the assumed structural integrity is compromised in their emotional decay, which arouses austere visions of physically neglected areas and the associated feelings of hostility and isolation.

Circles are a strong motif in Bodie’s latest body of work. An admirer of Dylan Thomas’ collected poems, ‘Deaths and Entrances’, Bodie is particularly inspired by Thomas's quote, “Every idea, intuitive or intellectual can be imaged and translated in terms of the body”. Using it as creative inspiration, Bodie explores the idea of building a bridge between the world of thought and the world of physical experience. 

With Manshaped Moon, a circle bisects the figure, creating a division between the two sides of the whole. Bodie forces us to look at the delicate and sensitive tension that stretches between the two polarities, one side dark and the other light; a metaphor for the highs and lows of human nature we often refer to as the human condition.

The burden of sainthood or expectation is considered in the piece, Saint About To Fall. The oversized halo appears to be slipping but we’re not quite sure. Will it fall... we ask ourselves as we hold our breath momentarily.

Bodie’s third piece, Green Fuse, considers rebirth and the coiled power of nature. The circle arcing over the contorted figure begins and ends on different planes as Bodie plays with ideas for potential change and growth within different time dimensions. He hints at hope, which inevitably accompanies it yet remains elusive.

Bodie used to exhibit regularly with the McHardy Sculpture Company in London and has shown work in Wales after receiving both an Arts Festival Residency and funding from the Welsh Arts Council. His bronze piece ‘Cloud’ was featured in a Channel 4 docu-drama, together with works by Elisabeth Frink and Henry Moore, and he has sculptures in various private and corporate collections.

Articles and Reviews

The Bath Magazine, Sept 2018

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The Bath Magazine, August 2018

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